The US Election System: How Can It Be Improved?

The US electoral process is democratic, and it involves different political seats from senators to the presidency. According to the electoral system, a candidate who acquires the majority votes wins the seat that is being vied for.

There are several ways to improve the U.S Electoral system which can better the system and make it ideal:

Increased Media Broadcast for New Candidates

Incumbents generally have more money and wealth to further their campaigns than new legislative seat contenders. As such these incumbents are expected to have more propelled campaigns, and the media, which makes money in campaigns lean on incumbents due to their already established influence and wealth. As such to better the electoral system, the media should either increase their broadcasts or give free airtime to first-time contenders.

Changing Terms of Service for the U.S. House of Representatives

The U.S House of Representatives currently faces elections every two years. To better, the U.S Electoral system can be improved if this term was changed to four years which is the same time the president is elected. This will in a sense reduce the excess of a government which is divided. Since the president can be of one party and Congress another party. This will also, in the final analysis, prevent members of Congress from lacking involvement in the national voter opinion.

Include Sixteen Year Old’s in Voting

Voting is every citizen’s right. If we can entrust sixteen-year-olds with driving licenses, we should also consider giving them the responsibility of voting. This way schools and colleges can take it upon themselves to bring these students to the ballot. This will also instill in them a sense of duty and maybe in future better their enthusiasm in voting and make them more dedicated to our country’s future.

Ease the Voting Process

The manual voting system has been in place for years. However, the digital age of voting has come to be, and with universities and banks applying online platforms for services such as funds transfer and even elections then the United States should review the practicality of having a digital and or electronic voting system. Making the process, easier will make the voter turnout higher and thus make elections more inclusive.

Ban Public Donations and Contributions

Contributions and donations, which come mainly from large firms, organizations, and associations, can prompt debasement and corruption. Government financed elections to each candidate are the best approach. This will ensure that individuals elected to office are not held to ransom by the corporations that funded their elections.

Eliminate the Electoral College

In the case of the general election, we should eliminate the Electoral College. I comprehend why it was required previously, yet in our difficult time, it's pointless. The election race ought to be considered as one individual, one vote. An ideal case of why the electoral college should be eliminated is the 2000 race. Gore got more votes, yet Bush won considering our dated framework. That is somewhat insane to me.

Limit Presidential Possibility

We should limit the possibility of being president to the individuals who have worked previously as Vice presidents, in Congress or as a senator. An excessive number of competitors are unfit. You wouldn't employ your mail carrier, as decent as he might be, to perform heart medical procedures. While its popularity based to give anybody a chance to keep running for office, the presidency should be taken seriously.

In conclusion, the United States is a democratic figurehead in the entire world, and any changes to better our electoral system will be viewed in intense scrutiny by the world as a whole. As such if we do undertake such measures as stated above and they better our electoral system, the world will follow. In a sense, we will be improving the world and ensuring that quality and serious leaders are chosen, and progress and development agendas are implemented in respect to the people's wishes.


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